Lost in translation ?

From a recent mail on the Foundation list, here’s an interesting quote:

Collaboration among advisory board members: Now that we have a sys admin team in place would like to find ways that we can collaborate better. Mentioned an article by J5 that talked about that RH, Novell and others are less involved because of the maintenance burden.They spend time on money on things like translations. No process to get them upstream and so they do it all over again next year.

It is the last line that I find a bit off-key and, out of context.

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4 thoughts on “Lost in translation ?”

  1. I read your response and, thank you for putting it out. However, Stormy’s note mentioned “an article by J5”, I am looking for either a link to the article or, some context to the quote from J5 himself.

    To the best of my knowledge, not only does Red Hat invest in translations, improving translation quality; it also ensures that translations/localizations of upstream projects like GNOME are upstream. The need to re-do them all them time (with the implication of a non-standard process) does not really arise or, exist.

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  2. Agreed with Sankarshan, as far as I know it has always been a hallmark of the l10n teams funded by Red Hat to work within upstream projects. L10n has always been considered like any other code or content. There is no advantage to carrying the burden of maintenance. An RPM is ideally upstream source and a .spec file, with minimal patches. This includes translations.

    I also looked for any similar content by J5 (John Palmieri), with no luck. The situation Vincent clarifies on might have occurred in the distant past, but things shouldn’t have been that way since at least Red Hat Enterprise Linux 3. All the l10n is done via the Fedora Project on the latest projects integrated in that distro, so the l10n is complete before Red Hat Engineering forks for RHEL.

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